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    Archaeological Dig at the Royall House and Slave Quarters

Welcome to the Royall House and Slave Quarters

In the eighteenth century, the Royall House and Slave Quarters was home to the largest slaveholding family in Massachusetts and the enslaved Africans who made their lavish way of life possible.  Today, the Royall House and Slave Quarters is a museum whose architecture, household items, archaeological artifacts, and programs bear witness to intertwined stories of wealth and bondage, set against the backdrop of America’s quest for independenexterior_SQ_from_house_porchce.

The Slave Quarters is the only remaining such structure in the northern United States, and the Royall House is among the finest colonial-era buildings in New England. The museum is open to the public for tours on weekends from May through October, while school and group tours are available from mid-March to mid-November.  The museum also presents a range of public programs throughout the year.  Members receive free admission to the museum and free or discounted admission to most programs.

Museums are not Neutral

As people across the world take to the streets to protest the police killings of Breonna Taylor in Louisville, George Floyd in Minneapolis, and Tony McDade in Tallahassee, we have a responsibility to speak out.

We are committed to telling the history of slavery and freedom while highlighting how the legacy of enslavement creates systemic inequalities today. Thus, we stand in solidarity with the protesters bravely fighting against police violence and demanding justice, accountability, and a transformation of policies that sustain racial and economic inequalities.

Our job is not only to listen, but also to uplift and amplify the history and voices of Black people locally, nationally, and globally in the struggle for freedom.

Museums are not Neutral. Black Lives Matter.